Reader 02/25/2020 (Tue) 23:29:17 Id: 0fb6d8 No.15657 del
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Based on what we know right now we believe the immediate risk in the US remains 'low'. But we must use this time to prepare for the event of human transmission in the US. Part of that is educating the public about what transition from emergency measures to community-based measures would look like. Patients with the virus with mild or no symptoms have been placed in medical environments in quarantined. That level of care is mostly not needed. In most cases, the proper care would be management at home, with use of healthcare facilities only permitted for those with other underlying conditions, the elderly and other vulnerable people. Circumstances suggest the virus will cause a pandemic, if that happens, new strategies will need to be implemented. These interventions at the community level will vary depending on local conditions. It's not so much a question of if this will happen, but when, and how many people will become infected, and how many of those will develop a more complicated disease."

Well, there you have it. After that, Dr. Fauci spoke about the issue of a vaccine. Vaccine development began as soon as the virus genome was uploaded to the international database, and that human trials would likely begin within two months. He then explained the painstaking process of drug trials to illustrate why it will take "an additional 6-8 months" just to get the vaccine in circulation within "a year-year-and-a-half". But that's okay, Dr. Fauci said, because this virus isn't going away any time soon, and will likely return with next year's flu season.
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Update (1500ET): Germany has confirmed its first case of the virus, a traveler who reportedly came from Milan. Maybe they should give the whole 'keep the borders open' idea a rethink? Meanwhile, HHS is delivering its press conference: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1MnxnQbOmAmJO
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Update (1445ET): Algeria has confirmed its first case of the virus as the focus on the Middle East intensifies. Back in the US, the Dems are on the offensive against President Trump, with Chuck Schumer likening the administration's purportedly 'lackluster' virus response to Chernobyl (we also enjoyed the HBO series, Mr. Senator). Conn. Sen. and wax-faced robot Dick Blumenthal also criticized Trump's request for Congressional funds as "too little, too late."
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Update (1420ET): Kuwait has halted all flights to Singapore and Japan, according to Al Arabiya, as the paranoia over the outbreak in Iran intensifies, particularly among the GCC member states who barely need an excuse to shit on Iran.
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Update (1400ET): Here's an update on the situation in Iran via the Washington Post. Iran has confirmed 95 cases across the country, with at least 15 deaths, as more cases have popped up in Bahrain, the region of Kirkuk in neighboring Iraq, and elsewhere.
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Update (1335ET): [Missing. Kudlow propaganda removed. He's a kike]
Granted, there have been bright spots, but we can't help but wonder: Is Kudlow looking at the same data we are? And how does one explain gold and the 30-year? As far as rate cuts are concerned, Kudlow says "I'm not hearing that. I'm not hearing the Fed is going to make any panic moves." [Pic related] We can almost hear the bulls shouting 'Aw, C'mon Larry!' at their TV screens.
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Update (1245ET): More updates out of Europe. Earlier, we reported the first coronavirus cases had been confirmed in Austria and Croatia, showing that the virus has now spread to both central and southeastern Europe. Over in Italy, the number of confirmed cases has surpassed 300 to 322, while the number of dead climbed to 10, according to Italian emergency chief Angelo Borrelli, who said the newly deceased were over the age of 80. That's up from just 20 confirmed cases on Friday. Newly deceased were over 80 years old, says at press conference in Rome Tuesday. The new infections include three cases in southern Sicily region, Italian Civil Protection official Borrelli said.