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The 80s general thread Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 05:41:03 [Preview] No. 30001
Please describe how the 80s era was to live in. I wasn't born in that era and would like to now.

I heard that it was the best time to be alive, but I'm not so sure about that. Would enjoy a perspective from someone who lived through it. People on this chan post from different regions and nations, so I'd also be interested in hearing what happened in your side of the world.

And post anything you liked or hated about that era.


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 18:24:57 [Preview] No.30004 del
the 80's were gay as fuck


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 21:33:17 [Preview] No.30005 del
>>30004
you're gay as fuck


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 21:45:28 [Preview] No.30006 del
8 my pick


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 21:59:50 [Preview] No.30007 del
>>30004
No it was breddy gud

>>30005
THIS


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 22:00:24 [Preview] No.30008 del
>>30006
Who dis? Reminds me of Boy George he was a pretty good singer tbh


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 22:44:04 [Preview] No.30009 del
>>30008
morrissey, like boy george, but not gay


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 23:36:42 [Preview] No.30010 del
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I was born in the 70's, so I remember it pretty well. Basically I spent a whole lot of time outside the house, riding my bike or hanging out with friends (and usually that meant also being outside). Going to some relatives houses could be boring sometimes, if they didn't have any kids. Even if they had a TV (which in some cases was black & white), they were usually watching something for adults. But sometimes they had westerns with cowboys & indians, and that was cool. A lot of people had landlines phones at their house (usually the rotary dial kind) and sometimes we'd do conference calls or prank calls. If you wanted to make phone calls outside, you had to use a payphone, and those were everywhere (well in the cities anyway, out in the coutryside not so much). CB radios were huge! (I mean tons of people had one), and they were your last resort if your car broke down in the boonies (short of stumbling upon a farm or something where they had a landline phone). I guess some people did HAM radio too (one of our neighbors was into that) but it wasn't nearly as big as the CB scene. Almost everyone wore a wristwatch to keep track of time, and a lot of those you had to wind up in the morning (unless it was a fancy digital watch with battery, but I didn't get one of those for a long time). On public transportation, people often read newspapers, magazines, or books. There weren't many TV stations, and they pretty much shut off at the end of the night, instead of broadcasting 24/7 like today (and it was analog signal over the air, so you just needed an antenna to receive it). I didn't watch much TV though, mostly played outside, rode my bike, read some books and comic books. Later on I got into tabletop wargames (the hexagon & counter type) and roleplaying game. Oh and we had these CYOA type books too.


Anonymous 09/21/2020 (Mon) 23:41:51 [Preview] No.30011 del
Things generally sucked, but there were some good points. Almost all of the music was terrible. Reagan gutted regulation, social services, deinstitutionalized all the crazy people, and established black ops gun and drug smuggling to fund agencies like the CIA which set the stage for poverty in America, rampant capitalism with its inherent greed (big pharma, health care destroyed by insurerers, unregulated telcoms and their never-ending "promo" and "bundle" scams) and of course, the violent drug cartels and the establishment of violent gangs in America. We can thank the 80s for all that shit. However, we did get the punk movement and everything that can be culturally traced to it. We got Mad Max. During the 80s you could buy a 60s musclecar for almost nothing and bomb around in your very own badass rubber-melting chick magnet. We got microcomputers. Those of us who hung out on the chans of the early 80s (which were dialup bulletin boards using 300 and 1200 baud Hayes modems) and got what that meant and where it was going were set for life. That right there made the 80s worth it.


Anonymous 09/22/2020 (Tue) 00:08:03 [Preview] No.30012 del
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>>30010 (cont)
Schools had blackboards and chalk, and everyone took notes on paper. I used fountain pens, which were comfy to write with. We didn't have multiple choice tests, so you had to write your answer next to the question (and show how you arrived at that answer, in math for example). Also we weren't allowed to use calculators, everything was done by hand on scratch paper. Schools had computers to some degree, and more as time went on. I think it was in 1980 that one of my teachers brought a teletype into class one day and plugged it into the phone jack and announced that we were going to take a test on the computer. I wasn't really impressed that day, and frankly I didn't quite get what the big deal was about. It would probably have helped if I'd been able to see the actual computer on the other end of the phone line (some kind of mainframe probably). Some years later I got to use Apple II's, IBM PC's, and various other systems. Naturally there weren't fancy at all and had only green monochrome monitors and floppy disks. But it was still a lot of fun to program in BASIC and Logo. Needless to day none of these computer had a GUI, they were all command-line driven. The biggest OS in the early 80's was CP/M, which eventually got overshadowd by MSDOS when IBM chose Microsoft instead of Digital Research. But even so, CP/M was a fine OS that remained useful and even shipped with new computers well into the mid 90's. My own first computer even came with it on floppy disk (but by default it would boot into BASIC from ROM). The 8-bit computer games were loads of fun! I still like them to this day (some more than others). And then there were the arcades and pinball machines at every mall and most bars. Even grocery and convenience stores tended to had an arcade machine or two.


Anonymous 09/22/2020 (Tue) 00:32:27 [Preview] No.30013 del
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>>30012 (cont)
Getting software could be a problem. I pretty much pirated everything I could by copying floppy disks from other kids. Otherwise I typed up programs from listings that were in books and magazines. I guess that helped me to get better at BASIC too (often had to debug the program or fix typos). It wasn't until the mid 90's that I got a PC with modem and my own phone line. Quite frankly most home computers in the 80's were isolated from any network. BTW computers and software back then came with real manuals, and you were expected to read these. :) There were no illusions about "intuitive interface" crap and all the other bullshit. I guess it fits in well with the era where you have to write out your answers on a school test, instead of multiple guess.


Anonymous 09/23/2020 (Wed) 05:14:16 [Preview] No.30022 del
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>>30013
>>30012
>>30011
>>30010
Thanks for all the info. It's a lot to take in, so give me some time to read all of it and respond appropriately


Anonymous 09/23/2020 (Wed) 05:16:54 [Preview] No.30023 del
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>>30011
>Reagan gutted regulation, social services,
> and established black ops gun and drug smuggling to fund agencies like the CIA which set the stage for poverty in America,

Did all of that really happen fam?
>T. not an American

>deinstitutionalized all the crazy people,
I thought that was the Nixon fellow who did it


Anonymous 09/23/2020 (Wed) 10:53:20 [Preview] No.30033 del
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>>30010
By hex & counter wargames I mean like this kind. Since there's no computer to manage the game, you have to roll dice and lookup the results of actions on charts, after adding up whatever modifiers apply to the situation. The wargaming scene was really big, and there was even a bunch of magazines that catered to it, even some that came with games inside (you were supposed to mount/glue the map and counter sheets onto thin cardboard and then cut them to size). There were also play-by-mail systems for strategy games where dozens or even hundreds of players participated, and were managed by a computer. But I think those were a bit different from the hex & counter style wargames, with rules more suited to PBM. One old guy I played AD&D with sometimes was really into those PBM games. I don't remember the name of the system, but they used historical Earth of late medieval era as their map.
Speaking of maps, you had to know how to use one if you wanted to get around, because there weren't any GPS for the plebs. That and the absence of cellphones also means that you weren't constantly tracked everywhere you went, and in fact most cars didn't even have a computer in them (carburetor motor doesn't need one).
And I guess the biggest problem with Reagan is that he sent all the american manufacturing overseas.


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:05:18 [Preview] No.30048 del
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>>30009
>morrissey, like boy george, but not gay

Oghey. Morrisey reminds me of Jim Morrison for some reason. Maybe it's the name


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:14:36 [Preview] No.30049 del
>>30010
>Basically I spent a whole lot of time outside the house, riding my bike or hanging out with friends (and usually that meant also being outside).

Sounds like a fun childhood

> A lot of people had landlines phones at their house (usually the rotary dial kind) and sometimes we'd do conference calls or prank calls.
>If you wanted to make phone calls outside, you had to use a payphone, and those were everywhere (well in the cities anyway, out in the coutryside not so much).

So pretty like the internet right now. Cool

>CB radios were huge!
wut are those?


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:15:30 [Preview] No.30050 del
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>>30010
>Oh and we had these CYOA type books too.

Reminds me of the old Conan the Barbarian comics tbh


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:16:57 [Preview] No.30051 del
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>>30011
>During the 80s you could buy a 60s musclecar for almost nothing and bomb around in your very own badass rubber-melting chick magnet.

Living the dream right there


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:18:47 [Preview] No.30052 del
>>30012
>The biggest OS in the early 80's was CP/M, which eventually got overshadowd by MSDOS when IBM chose Microsoft instead of Digital Research. But even so, CP/M was a fine OS that remained useful and even shipped with new computers well into the mid 90's. My own first computer even came with it on floppy disk (but by default it would boot into BASIC from ROM). The 8-bit computer games were loads of fun!

Do you have a download link or names?


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 20:28:24 [Preview] No.30053 del
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>>30033
>y hex & counter wargames I mean like this kind. Since there's no computer to manage the game, you have to roll dice and lookup the results of actions on charts, after adding up whatever modifiers apply to the situation. The wargaming scene was really big, and there was even a bunch of magazines that catered to it, even some that came with games inside (you were supposed to mount/glue the map and counter sheets onto thin cardboard and then cut them to size).

That's pretty interesting. I never knew that even existed. You have to be really savvy to carry all of that out.

>And I guess the biggest problem with Reagan is that he sent all the american manufacturing overseas.

Is this Reagan fellow an evil guy or something? I'm starting to get that impression from him


Anonymous 09/25/2020 (Fri) 23:08:27 [Preview] No.30055 del
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>>30050
I was born too late in the 80s for any of that stuff really. There were some Goosebumps cyoa books I had though.
I just really liked the old comic book aesthetic back then, and just some of the properties in general. Yeah I had beast wars growing up but it wasn't quite the same as the original g1 transformers or GI Joes.

>>30033
That shit was cool, I really just played a little panzer general in the mid 90s. My brother made a hex game from scratch with the little green and beige plastic army guys we'd play against each other a little bit.

>>30049
CB radios are or were the radios truckers use. I think it became a hobbyist sorta thing around the time. Not sure if it's the same or similar to a HAM radio.


Anonymous 09/29/2020 (Tue) 16:43:43 [Preview] No.30066 del
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>>30049
CB = Citizen's Band, it's kinda like HAM radio but much lower power and you don't need a license, and the gear is less expensive. It used to be really popular in the 80's, but I guess it went out of style when cellphones became a thing. Truckers probably still use it because it's more reliable than cellphones (don't need towers or carrier/subscription) and you can just leave it on and listen to radio chatter, and possibly get some infos about the traffic situations on the road you're travelling on or whatever. You can tell when a vehicle has a CB radio because the antenna is pretty damn big.

>>30050
The Fighting Fantasy books went a step beyond CYoA books, because you actually rolled-up a character and fought monsters, acquired items that could enhance your stats, and in some cases could even cast spells (first one in the series that did that was Citadel of Chaos). So they were like a cross between tabletop RPG and computer text adventure (Colossal Cave, Zork, etc.) Other series took the concept a bit further. Lone Wolf was an epic saga where you take a character on a journey through dozens of books (in FF every book was self-contained). Fabled Lands was setup like a sandbox, where you can travel anywhere and (attempt to) do anything. Many of these books have been scanned and converted so you can play them on the computer now:
http://www.projectaon.org/
http://flapp.sourceforge.net/
About 15 years ago I bought a few dozen Fighting Fantasy books from ebay, since they were going for dirt cheap (came out to a bit less than $1 per book). Dunno if they're affordable anymore. Back then retro computer gear was cheap too.

>>30052
Well I could name a bunch, but you probably won't like all the ones I do. I'd suggest instead to head over to lemon64.com and look through their top 100 games list (they've also got a bunch of reviews and comments there, which is pretty handy). Then download VICE and try some of them out.
If you know japanese, you could go with MSX or PC-88 games instead. Some of those have (unofficial) english translations, but it can be a chore to get it working sometimes. I wanted to play PC-88 version of The Black Onyx, but none of the ROM & IPS files I tried worked for me.

>>30053
Squad Leader was one of the most difficult/complicated wargames at the time. I never got to play with anyone, just did some solo games where I played both sides (sounds boring but it was fun when you've got nothing better to do). There were also of course wargames made for beginners in mind, with much simpler rules. And there were also some made specifically for solo play. Also something else interesting: there were some tabletop roguelike games like SPI's Deathmaze, and its sequel Citadel of Blood. I guess Magic Realms (by Avalon Hill) was also kinda like that but the rules where much more complicated, and it was pretty much a full-fledged RPG.


Anonymous 09/29/2020 (Tue) 19:43:56 [Preview] No.30067 del
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>>30066
Squad Leader sounds cool. Looks like there was a PC version made of it at some point.
Very cool stuff all around anon.


Anonymous 09/30/2020 (Wed) 05:51:36 [Preview] No.30077 del
>>30055
>CB radios are or were the radios truckers use

Ah that explains it

>but it wasn't quite the same as the original g1 transformers or GI Joes.

There was also Thundercats and He-Man. Can't forget that


Anonymous 10/01/2020 (Thu) 01:16:03 [Preview] No.30079 del
(36.53 MB Wormy.pdf)
Speaking of comics, here's something cool. It's the complete series of Wormy, a strip that appeared in TSR's magazine The Dragon from the late 70's through the late 80's. More info here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wormy_(comic_strip)


Anonymous 10/01/2020 (Thu) 05:13:05 [Preview] No.30082 del
>>30079
Cool

You can dump anything 80s related here that you want


Anonymous 10/01/2020 (Thu) 05:13:50 [Preview] No.30083 del
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>>30079
>In the late 1980s, Wormy creator David A. Trampier abruptly vanished from public life. The final installment of Wormy ended the strip in the middle of an unfinished storyline. No further Wormy comics were ever published.

What happened there?


Anonymous 10/01/2020 (Thu) 11:34:29 [Preview] No.30087 del
>>30083
It's not clear what happened, but it seems like he left TSR not too long after Gary Gygax did, when Lorraine Williams took over the company. A lot of people apparently didn't like her, and it's possible she was particularly vindictive against certain people. Gary Gygax in particular had problems with her even after he founded another company and published an entirely new fantasy roleplaying game (Dangerous Journeys) and was starting to become successful again. They talk about it here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Gygax#Leaving_TSR
Now here's something unique: a french/hungarian anime from 1982, that's based on an older french SF short story. I found out about it because the famous comic book artist Moebius (Jean Giraud) worked on it. Here's more info but I don't recommend reading all that (spoilers) until you watch the anime.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Ma%C3%AEtres_du_temps
https://youtube.com/watch?v=zbdJkheFVyk [Embed]
That's the english dub version. I also have the original french release (with english subs) but no youtube link for it (I got it via demonoid.com in 2010). I can't upload that here since it's 680 MB, but it's probably not that interesting unless you know french.
I was going to attach the end credits music, but the server returned a "file format" error on the MP4, so I'm uploading this cool BASIC book instead. Every computer had BASIC in the 80's, and many of them even booted into it from ROM (or had a cartridge with it in ROM, like for example the Atari 400/800 series). BASIC was cool because it was simple and to the point, unlike modern scripting languages that they try to make as extensive and complicated as possible. And in most cases, the BASIC environment (REPL) acted as the computer's default shell, and if it was in ROM it booted in like 1 second flat. And you could pretty much do anything from BASIC, because you could read and write to the entire RAM and I/O ports. So you could like stuff some machine code at address 2000 (hex), for example, and in your BASIC program jump to it and start executing machine code directly. Good way to learn stuff! And it was cool to poke around in the memory and explore to see what's there. And you couldn't fuck it up because the computer always went back to factory defaults every time you hit the reset button or power-cycled it.


Anonymous 10/02/2020 (Fri) 00:52:25 [Preview] No.30089 del
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How about some filk!
https://youtube.com/watch?v=ow78cUDdTOg [Embed]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Hayes_(musician)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S-100_bus


Anonymous 10/05/2020 (Mon) 06:14:11 [Preview] No.30115 del
>>30089
On the last video, where artists allowed to draw the Kremlin like that?


Anonymous 10/05/2020 (Mon) 12:17:17 [Preview] No.30116 del
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>>30115
Sure, lots of people made drawings. Pic is title screen from the first commercial DOS release of Tetris, published in 1987.


Anonymous 10/05/2020 (Mon) 12:31:06 [Preview] No.30117 del
>>30116
Commodore Amiga release, published in 1988. This computer was way ahead of the IBM PC back then. And not just because it could display 32 simultaneous colors from a 4096 palette. But it also had integrated chips for sound and sprite/playfield, so it could be used as a game console. But it could also be used as a computer, because it had multitasking OS with GUI, and a powerful Motorolla 68000 processor that was easy to program and didn't have the retarded memory segmentation flaw of x86.


Anonymous 10/07/2020 (Wed) 02:09:51 [Preview] No.30123 del
>>30116
Tetris to me is the only thing good the USSR managed to pull off

I didn't know that though

>>30117
That's pretty advanced hardware for that era, ngl


Anonymous 10/07/2020 (Wed) 02:13:53 [Preview] No.30124 del
>>30066
>If you know japanese, you could go with MSX or PC-88 games instead.

Is the PC-88 related to the PC-98? Both were made in the 80s.

A little unrelated, but here's a documentary detailing more about what the PC-98 was.

NSFW vid btw


Anonymous 10/07/2020 (Wed) 02:15:10 [Preview] No.30125 del
>>30124
Gah forgot the youtube link

https://youtube.com/watch?v=OVpX2y6KjwA [Embed]


Anonymous 10/08/2020 (Thu) 00:47:25 [Preview] No.30133 del
>>30001
I spent the years 0-4 in the 80's and I can tell you it was a perfect utopian period where there was no such thing as politics or war or feminism and everything was just and fair.


Anonymous 10/09/2020 (Fri) 02:39:52 [Preview] No.30162 del
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>>30124
The PC-88 was the older model made by NEC before PC-98. It had an 8-bit Z80 CPU clocked at 4 MHz, very similar to my first computer. And they had very little memory, typically only 64 KB (the maximum the Z80 can access directly, without bank-switching hacks). And this was also the basic configuration for Sharp-X1 and MSX, which were its main competition at the time.

Now here's another cool thing about the 80's: bookstores! Long before amazon and ebay, you had to actually walk to a store and physically search the shelves. And that was fun, because the books often had nice artwork to look at, and catchy back-cover blurbs to read. This also allowed you to randomly stumble onto some book you never heard of before but catches your attention. And unlike today where the web stores jam ads and recommendations in your face based on some money-generating algorithms, this process was entirely organic. And this was even better in used bookstores, because their stock could include really ancient books from decades past. And there wasn't any youtube hype or endless web reviews or detailed dissections for everything under the sun. There was still a lot of mystery and things to explore on your own. And that was fucking cool!


Anonymous 10/09/2020 (Fri) 21:00:17 [Preview] No.30173 del
>>30162
>The PC-88 was the older model made by NEC before PC-98. It had an 8-bit Z80 CPU clocked at 4 MHz, very similar to my first computer. And they had very little memory, typically only 64 KB

Didn't know that. Thanks for the info

>Now here's another cool thing about the 80's: bookstores!
>. And that was fun
>There was still a lot of mystery and things to explore on your own. And that was fucking cool!

It really was. Lots of qt Goth chicks used to hang out there. I miss going to them. I do not think we'll ever get something like that again


Anonymous 10/10/2020 (Sat) 15:07:06 [Preview] No.30182 del
>>30173
>qt goth chicks
Stop it. We had some of those in school and now you're making my heart ache with nostalgia and that's just heckin wrong of you. I'm glad I'm not on facebook, because they're all probably fat now, and I really don't want to be forced to confront human frailty right now. 16yo goth cutie in HS lives forever in my brain. Elizabeth Zahner IIRC was one of 'em


Anonymous 10/12/2020 (Mon) 23:43:58 [Preview] No.30191 del
>>30182
I can confirm that most of the goth chicks from my school are either married, fat, or single mothers.

Many such cases

>Elizabeth Zahner IIRC was one of 'em

Who's that?


Anonymous 10/16/2020 (Fri) 13:05:56 [Preview] No.30200 del
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To play great game, you just need a computer with a little bit of free memory, any old graphics card, a floppy drive, and a keyboard.



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