BASED Reader 02/23/2019 (Sat) 07:22:33 Id: 8db227 No.14115 del
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Denmark is tightening its asylum system with the passage of new laws referred to as a 'paradigm shift' by officials, Danmarks Radio reports.

The bill, formally titled 'Act 140,' was agreed upon in Parliament by the populist right-wing Danish People's Party (DPP) and the Social Democrats (SD) and will go into effect on March 1st.

A primary aim of the legislation is to reduce the number of 'refugees' in the country by focusing on repatriation instead of integration, according to DPP chairman Peter Skaarup.

"You have to get used to the fact that when you come to Denmark, you are here temporarily, and once you have had temporary shelter, you go back again," Skaarup said.

Key points of the bill include

Residence permits for foreigners must be temporary and can be more easily revoked or not renewed.
Refugees must return to their home countries once it is safe enough to do so.
The Minister of Immigration can set a national limit on family reunifications (chain migration) on a month-to-month basis.
Penalties for breaking an entry ban are significantly increased, with much stiffer prison sentences for those caught in Denmark after being expelled.
Social welfare benefits to migrants will be reduced.

Immigration and Integration Minister Inger StĂžjberg, who is known as a relative hardliner, says she expects a "noticeable effect" on the migrant population in Denmark as a result of the new laws.

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